Tag Archives: plugin

Microsoft Access : XFDL Viewer – Introduction

I know, I said it yesterday that it is rare that I develop on Windows, but this is a long promised application.  In 2007, my unit administrator (in the U.S. Army Reserves) suggested code that would allow batch loading XFDL forms from MS Access.  Due to the scope of the Apps 4 The Army project, I was limited to using a web application.  Now that the project is submitted and done, I am free to do my original plan, which is code to do the same process in MS Access.

Starting this today, I realized how much I hate doing Visual Basic.  Particularly, VBA is very painful!!  It’s not that the language is bad but it just always feels bulky and pieced together to me.  It seems to lack the professionalism of C/C++ and the flow of Python.  But, I may be alone in that.

I have a question for my readers though. Would anyone have an interest in seeing this project on SourceForge?  The Apps 4 the Army project is no longer my intellectual right, but a desktop application, a MS Office Plugin, etc… that’s all good to make public.  So let me know, if I get readers saying we’d like to help; then I will happily move this project to SourceForge!

To the authors of Hamster.

I found your project listed on this blog (which is a great read for Linux users)!  I will not rewrite that author’s excellent post, if you’re curious what Hamster is, go read the blog!  This tool is great for anyone obsessed with data and time tracking.  Essentially, it will show you what you do during the day.  For those who are bad at time management (me), then this tool can help increase performance.  But in using it, I found that I wanted something more.  Specifically, I didn’t want to tell it what I was doing.  I mean, I switched from coding my wardriver to blogging five minutes ago and I still haven’t updated.  Even worse, what happens when I’m multitasking between work, programming, army, etc.  I would like this application to update what is happening as I change it, rather than take the five seconds to update my current task.  I know, I’m lazy.

So what do I think should happen?  Well, I’ve commented on the post that I found this program that I would like it to be automated.  Take a ‘picture’ every minute of active processes and then use that data to associate that program with your current activity!  For example, the browser is open (you can even catch the website name) and you have a setting that associates that program/page with an activity, Hamster then updates what you are doing.  You could even go so far as to use what window is in front, the next behind, the next behind, etc to rank the amount of work you are doing with that task.

With my Army project done, my wardriver being worked on at a steady pace, I think this would be a fun program.  Anyone else interested in this?  Let me know through your comments…

Custom Brush for SyntaxHighlighter Evolved

Okay, before I get started let me just say that I realize there are several already set-up plugins for the WordPress Plugin, SyntaxHighlighter Evolved to include a brush for the *.batch language.  Also, there is a great article by the Plugin’s author that will guide you through developing a brush.  The reason I am posting mine is to pass a long a few things that went unsaid for the less experienced WordPress Plugin developer, but let me just say that this was much easier both in the plugin development and brush development than I thought it would be.  The reason I made my own brush, it’s just more fun to make my own!

Now, that being said, here we go!   My post for “Violating IT Policy” included a batch script for Cygwin to be portable.  since there was no brush in SyntaxHighlighter Evolved To develop a brush, you will need to set-up a new plugin for word press.  The plugin will be adopted by SyntaxHighlighter Evolved as you will see in a moment.  The structure for this plugin will be:

<root folder>/wp-content/plugins/
                        /plugins/<javascript brush>.js
                        /plugins/<php plugin>.php

For the javascript brush, this does have some tricky elements. but I’ve commented what I’m doing below.

/** shBrushBatch.js **/
/* Declare a new brush with SyntaxHighlighter.brushes.<your name for the brush> */
SyntaxHighlighter.brushes.Batch = function()
{
	/* Declare words that you need highlighted */
	var variable = 'clear cls goto set';
	var constants = 'if or';

	/* This is the heart of your brush, you can use the *.
	/* SyntaxHighlighter.regexLib.* brushes when applicapble. */
	this.regexList = [
		/* You may notice that my comments are looking for a css that does not match. */
		/* I'll explain below the script. */
		// comments
		{ regex: /(^::|rem).*$/gmi,                             css: 'string'},
		// stings
		{ regex: SyntaxHighlighter.regexLib.doubleQuotedString, css: 'comments'},
		{ regex: SyntaxHighlighter.regexLib.singleQuotedString, css: 'comments'},
		{ regex: /echo.*$/gmi,                                  css: 'keyword'},
		// variables
		{ regex: /%w+\1/gmi,                                    css: 'keyword'},
		{ regex: /%\*|%%?~?[fdpnxsatz]*[0-9a-z]\b/gmi,          css: 'keyword'},
		// clear cls keywords
		{ regex: new RegExp(this.getKeywords(variable), 'gmi'), css: 'variable'},
		// if and key words
		{ regex: new RegExp(this.getKeywords(constants), 'gmi'),css: 'constants'},
		// labels
		{ regex: /^:.+$/gmi,                                    css: 'script'}
	];
};

/* Create the highlighter object. */
SyntaxHighlighter.brushes.Batch.prototype = new SyntaxHighlighter.Highlighter();
/* Set the Aliases */
SyntaxHighlighter.brushes.Batch.aliases = ['bat','batch'];

So the reason that my css does not match the actual of what it is would be because the theme does not match my preference.  I perfer comments to be green, so since the string for the RDark format is green, I had to assing my comments to the string.  This was pretty confusing but the way I figured out my color scheme was simple enough.  In <root>/wp-content/plugins/syntaxhighlighter/styles/ you will find all of the css files to coordinate with the theme.  Half way down, you will see “Actual Syntax Highlighter Colors” and it is at this point that you will want to see what all of your options are.  Rather than converting #5CE63B to green, I went and made a sample script once my plugin was complete, I then went and set up a color tester like this, in place of my normal brush file:

/** shBrushBatch.js  - color test version **/
SyntaxHighlighter.brushes.Batch = function()
{
	/* 	set your wordpress to:
			1
			string
			comments
			... continue until the last keyword ...
			color3
			1 I dropped the correct closing in the example for formatting. */
	var string = 'string';
	var comments = 'comments';
	// ... continue to the last keyword ...
	var keyword = 'color3';

	this.regexList = [
		{ regex: new RegExp(this.getKeywords(string), 'gmi'), 	 css: 'string'},
		{ regex: new RegExp(this.getKeywords(comments), 'gmi'),  css: 'comments'},
		// ... continue to the last keyword ...
		{ regex: new RegExp(this.getKeywords(color3), 'gmi'), 	 css: 'color3'}
	];
};

SyntaxHighlighter.brushes.Batch.prototype = new SyntaxHighlighter.Highlighter();
SyntaxHighlighter.brushes.Batch.aliases = ['bat','batch'];

After doing this and seeing the colors, I could then associate which color I wanted for which sets of syntax.

Now, onto making the plugin work.  Obviously, you’ll need both of these files to have any results.  What this does is when you activate this plugin (yes, it does show in your plugins) then SyntaxHighlighter adopts it.  This script is pretty standard from what I saw online and is almost exactly out of the author’s blog post.  The comments at the front are what will appear in your WordPress under Plugins.  I’ve kept the comments mostly the same as the author, as he is describing it better than I could.

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: Batch Brush - SyntaxHighlighter Evolved
Descriptionn:  Adds support for the Batch language to SyntaxHighlighter Evolved.
Author: Zachary D. Skelton
Version: 1.0.2
Author URI: http://www.skeltonnetworks.com/
*/

// SyntaxHighlighter doesn't do anything until early in the "init" hook.
add_action('init','syntaxhighlighter_batch_regscript');

// Tell SyntaxHighlighter about this new brush.
add_filter('syntaxhighlighter_brushes','syntaxhighlighter_batch_addlang');

// Register the brush with WordPress.
function syntaxhighlighter_batch_regscript() {
	wp_register_script('syntaxhighlighter-brush-batch',
		plugins_url('shBrushBatch.js',__FILE__),
		array('syntaxhighlighter-core'),'1.0.2');
	}
// Add alternative names for your brush.
function syntaxhighlighter_batch_addlang($brushes) {
	$brushes['batch'] = 'batch';
	$brushes['bat'] = 'batch';

	return $brushes;
	}
?>

At this point you should be able to load your page.  If it cannot find the brush (you’ll get a dialog to let you know), you could replace plugins_url() in line 19 with a string of a direct path to the file, but there should be no need for it.  The most common reason for this is an error in your javascript brush, so make sure to check that before going to insane.  After this is all done, you may have problems seeing the results.  It took me 5 loads of the correct format before I saw the change, in that case, deactivate the plugin, clear the cache, change the plugin version number in line 6 and re-activate the plugin.  Should not need all of that but some browsers are fussy, and that takes care of any problem with the cache. As I said before, this is well documented and relatively easy to make.  You can see that I made my plugin only apply to my script but it would be easy to add more things to it.  I used a lot of my regex directly from this plugin because that is a skill I’m still working on.  But this was surprisingly simple, and you can find lots of good information on making plugins of your own.  It is surprisingly not too tough!