Tag Archives: wifi

Garmin Wardriver – Prototype Released

This project went together smoother than I thought it would.  The source code and application are available on it’s SourceForge page.  I’m still working to create a range for the networks and then use circles as points.  I’m thinking if I factor in strength, I can come up with an approximate (no where near exact) range.  Unfortunately, without the right antenna, it’s not likely to come up with a direction but I can get the entry and exit and create a circle around it from that.  Unfortunately, to convert the minute data to feet will take some fancy math due to variations in minutes with the longitude.  More on that in a future post.

For those wanting to use the application, here are the steps to get it working.

  1. Ensure you have iwlist, gpsbabel and Google Earth installed.
    • sudo apt-get install wireless-tools gpsbabel googleearth-package
  2. Plug in your gps.
  3. Test with ‘sudo gpsbabel -T -i garmin -f /dev/ttyUSB0
  4. If that pulls data, run ‘sudo ./garminwardriver.py
  5. Open your ‘out.kml’ in Google Earth (Start Google Earth->File->Open)

And there you go, data that can be drawn on any wifi card with any GPS device (if you change the code for your device).  Try it out and let me know if it works or what errors you come up with.  This is just a prototype, so expect v1.01 to be out soon with updates.

Update:

I wrote this post and completely forgot to add the screen shots!

apprunning
Gathering Data
googleearth
Google Earth Data

Garmin Wardriver

For my birthday, my wife got me a GPS (Garmin Venture HC).  I have been disappointed in it’s integration with Linux, most particularly it’s ability to communicate with gpsd (usb input, not serial).  I had high hopes of doing some wardriving and kismet does not gather any of the data despite it’s configuration.  I can get gpsd to get some cryptic messages from the device but I found that this command: `gpsbabel -T -t garmin -f /dev/ttyUSB0` will generate the current coordinates.  So instead of getting frustrated, I’ve decided to open my first SourceForge project.  You can find it listed as Garmin Wardriver.

The concept seems simple enough, generate location through direct communication with the GPS device or through the gpsbabel command above and then gather a list of local ESSID’s with their strength.  With this data, updated each second, one could generate a location for entering an ESSID’s area, it’s strength as you move through and when out.  Output this to an overlay for a program such as Google Earth and that is a wardriver!  I can see this branching to more advanced uses but for the basic proof of concept, a command line program should suffice.  This will be written in Python and I’ve looked into utilizing the pygarmin and pywifi modules instead of generating information from preexisting programs.

Linux bash script for wifi.

When starting with Backtrack4, I compiled and installed the Broadcom wl driver for my laptop’s wifi. The unfortunate thing was that I got very frustrated because the default connection manager, wicd was getting confused when I would go to a network other than the one I initially connected to after boot-up. Shortly after that, Ubuntu 9.10 was experiencing the same difficulty after upgrading the kernel. So to work around using a network manager, I created a quick script to use.

In this script, you can see that you can pass a variable for your network name and key in the same format as you would normally. This was a fun script as it could easily be adapted as it’s own network manager, even with a little more work, you could have it in the tray, it’s own gui, etc. It’s nothing more than the commands typically used to connect on wifi but it just automated the process. I then went and created a child script for my most used networks, and after placing these in my bin, I actually have started to prefer this method.

Here’s the script:

#!/bin/bash

# die with honor
function usage() {
	echo "usage: ./connectWifi \"<essid>\" [key]"
	echo "       *key in ascii prefaces s:[key]"
	echo
	exit 1
}

# killed in disgrace
function die() {
	echo
	echo "   [*] ERROR: $1..."
	echo
	exit 1
}

# check for essid
if [[ $1 ]]; then
	# setup
	echo "Starting..."
	ifconfig eth1 down
	dhclient -r eth1 -q
	echo " -Previous connection dropped."
	ifconfig eth1 up
	iwconfig eth1 essid "$1"
	echo " -ESSID Set to $1."
	# check for key
	if [[ $2 ]]; then
		iwconfig eth1 key $2
		echo " -Key set to $2."
	fi
	# connect
	iwconfig eth1 mode Managed
	echo " -Connecting..."
	echo
	dhclient eth1
	# announce success
	if [[ $? -eq 0 ]]; then
		echo
		echo "Successfully connected to $1!"
		echo
		exit 0
	fi

else
	# no variables
	usage
fi

# declare failure
die "Failed to connect to $1."

This can serve as a good example of both the commands in connecting to wifi and an introduction to bash scripting. Please comment on the code and offer any suggestions you may have!